Deacons & Elders Q&A

Elders, Deacons, Teachers, Evangelist

Elders Q&A



What does the Bible say about the role of elders/overseers?

The role of an elder or overseer is described in several places in the New Testament, particularly in the pastoral letters of Paul to Timothy and Titus. Here are some of the key biblical passages that describe the role of elders/overseers in the early church:

  • 1 Timothy 3:1-7: In this passage, Paul gives instructions for choosing overseers/elders, including requirements related to their character, behavior, and relationships. Overseers must be “above reproach,” faithful to their spouse, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not given to drunkenness or violence, and well thought of by outsiders.

  • Titus 1:5-9: In this passage, Paul gives similar instructions to Titus about choosing elders in the churches on the island of Crete. He emphasizes the importance of choosing elders who are “blameless,” who manage their households well, who are not arrogant or quick-tempered, and who hold firmly to the trustworthy message as it has been taught.

  • Acts 20:28: In this passage, Paul speaks to the elders of the church in Ephesus and charges them to “be shepherds of the church of God, which he bought with his own blood.” This passage emphasizes the importance of the elder’s role as a shepherd or pastor to the flock of believers in their care.

Overall, the role of an elder or overseer in the early church was focused on spiritual leadership and guidance, with an emphasis on personal character, teaching ability, and pastoral care. Elders were called to oversee the spiritual welfare of the congregation, teaching sound doctrine, providing pastoral care and counseling, and serving as examples of godly living. While the specific tasks and responsibilities of elders may vary depending on the context and culture in which they operate, the core mission of spiritual leadership and guidance remains central to the role of an elder in every age.



What are the Requirements to Be an Elder?

 

 

  1. Above reproach: The elder must have a good reputation both inside and outside the church (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:6-7). This requirement sets a high standard for the elder’s character and conduct, which reflects the character of Christ and is a model for the rest of the church.

  2. Husband of one wife: The elder must be a one-woman man and be faithful to his wife (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:6). This requirement emphasizes the importance of marital fidelity, and demonstrates the elder’s commitment to his wife and family.

  3. Temperate: The elder must be self-controlled and not given to excess or indulgence (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:7). This quality demonstrates the elder’s ability to exercise discipline and self-restraint, which is necessary for effective leadership and service in the church.

  4. Sober-minded: The elder must have a clear and disciplined mind, able to think and act rationally and with wisdom (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8). This quality is essential for making sound decisions and providing wise counsel to others.

  5. Respectable: The elder must be dignified and worthy of respect (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8). This quality reflects the elder’s maturity and wisdom, and inspires confidence and trust in those under his care.

  6. Hospitable: The elder must be willing to open his home and show hospitality to others (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8). This quality demonstrates the elder’s love for others and his willingness to serve and care for those in need.

  7. Able to teach: The elder must be skilled in teaching and able to explain the truths of the Bible accurately and clearly (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:9). This quality is essential for equipping and edifying the church, and for defending the truth against false teaching.

  8. Not a recent convert: The elder must be someone who has been a believer for some time and has demonstrated maturity in the faith (1 Timothy 3:6). This requirement ensures that the elder has a solid foundation in the faith and has demonstrated a consistent pattern of spiritual growth and maturity.

  9. Not violent or quarrelsome: The elder must be peaceable and not given to fighting or contentious behavior (1 Timothy 3:3, Titus 1:7). This quality is essential for maintaining unity and harmony in the church, and for modeling Christ-like behavior in all situations.

  10. Gentle: The elder must be kind, patient, and gentle in his dealings with others (1 Timothy 3:3). This quality reflects the elder’s love and compassion for others, and is essential for effective shepherding and care of the church.

  11. Not a lover of money: The elder must be free from the love of money and material possessions (1 Timothy 3:3, Titus 1:7). This requirement ensures that the elder’s motives are pure and that he is not using his position for personal gain or advantage.

  12. Manages his own household well: The elder must have demonstrated his ability to lead and manage his own family well (1 Timothy 3:4-5, Titus 1:6). This requirement demonstrates the elder’s ability to provide effective leadership and care for his own family, which is a reflection of his ability to care for the church.



Can someone be an elder if their child is not a Christian?

This is a topic of much debate and needs careful prayer, study, and a conviction on unity.

According to Alexander Strauch’s book, “Biblical Eldership,” he does not believe that an elder’s child’s decision about their relationship with God automatically disqualifies the elder from serving in leadership.

Strauch explains that the Bible’s requirement that an elder’s children be “believers” (Titus 1:6) and “faithful” (1 Timothy 3:4) is not a guarantee of perfect obedience or salvation for the elder’s children. Rather, it is a requirement that the elder has demonstrated his ability to lead and manage his household well.

Strauch acknowledges that there may be situations where an elder’s adult child has chosen to live in a manner inconsistent with Christian belief and values. In such cases, Strauch advises that the elder should continue to pray and seek to influence his child toward repentance and faith. The elder should also seek the support and guidance of the church leadership and maintain transparency and accountability in his own life.

Overall, Strauch emphasizes the importance of grace and understanding in dealing with the complexities of family relationships and the challenges of leadership in the church. He notes that the ultimate goal of church leadership is to help individuals and families grow in their faith and relationship with Christ, and to provide a positive example of godly living and service to others.



what are the biblical day-to-day responsibilities of a Church elder?

  1. Prayer and intercession: Elders are to lead the church in prayer and intercession for the needs of the congregation and the community (James 5:14-16).

  2. Teaching and preaching: Elders are responsible for teaching and preaching the Word of God, and for ensuring that sound doctrine is being taught in the church (1 Timothy 3:2, 2 Timothy 4:2, Titus 1:9).

  3. Shepherding and counseling: Elders are to care for the spiritual needs of the congregation, providing guidance, support, and counsel to those in need (1 Peter 5:2-4).

  4. Oversight and discipline: Elders are responsible for the overall oversight of the church, ensuring that it is being run according to biblical principles, and for discipline of members who are living in sin (1 Timothy 5:20, Titus 1:9-11).

  5. Visitation and care: Elders are to visit and care for the sick, the elderly, and those in need, providing practical assistance and encouragement (James 1:27).

  6. Leading and decision-making: Elders are to provide leadership and direction for the church, making decisions on matters of policy and practice, and ensuring that the church is fulfilling its mission and purpose (Acts 20:28-32, 1 Peter 5:2-3).

Overall, the day-to-day responsibilities of elders involve caring for the spiritual and practical needs of the congregation, providing leadership and guidance, and ensuring that the church is fulfilling its biblical mandate.



What does the vetting process for a potential elder look like?

  1. Nominations: The church should seek nominations from the congregation for potential elders. These nominations should be made based on the biblical qualifications for elders as outlined in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-9.

  2. Evaluation: The church leadership should then evaluate the nominees based on their character, qualifications, and spiritual maturity. This evaluation should involve prayer, personal interviews, and examination of their life and doctrine.

  3. Training: If a nominee is found to be qualified, but lacks certain skills or knowledge, the church should provide training to help them develop in these areas.

  4. Public examination: Once a nominee has been evaluated and trained, the church should publicly examine him before appointing him as an elder. This examination should include questions about his doctrine, character, and qualifications.

  5. Appointment: If the nominee passes the public examination, the church should then appoint him as an elder through prayer, laying on of hands, and commissioning him for his role.

Overall, the process for vetting a potential church elder involves careful evaluation of their character, qualifications, and spiritual maturity, as well as providing training and public examination before appointment.

Deacons Q&A



What are the Biblical references to the role of Deacon in the Bible?

The role of a deacon is described in several places in the New Testament, including in the book of Acts and in the letters of Paul to Timothy and to the Philippians. Here are some of the key biblical passages that describe the role of deacons in the early church:

  • Acts 6:1-7: In this passage, the apostles appoint seven men to serve as deacons in order to address a practical need within the early church. The deacons are chosen to “wait on tables” and ensure that the distribution of food to widows is carried out fairly and effectively.

  • 1 Timothy 3:8-13: In this passage, Paul gives instructions for choosing deacons, including requirements related to their character, behavior, and relationships. Deacons must be “worthy of respect,” not “double-tongued” or given to excessive drinking, and must manage their own families well. They are also called to hold “deep truths of the faith with a clear conscience.”

  • Philippians 1:1: In this greeting, Paul addresses the letter to the “overseers and deacons” in the church at Philippi, indicating that deacons held an important role in the church alongside other leaders such as overseers (or elders).

Overall, the role of a deacon in the early church was focused on serving the needs of the community and supporting the work of other leaders in the church. While the specific tasks and responsibilities of deacons may vary depending on the context and culture in which they operate, the core mission of serving the church and sharing the love of Christ through practical acts of service remains central to the role of a deacon in every age.



What are the Requirements to Be a Deacon?

the biblical requirements for deacons are found in 1 Timothy 3:8-13. Here are the main requirements that Strauch identifies:

  1. Character: Deacons must be men of “dignity” or “respectable character,” as well as “not double-tongued” and “not addicted to much wine.” They must also be “tested” or proven in their character and conduct.

  2. Faithfulness: Deacons must be “faithful in all things,” meaning that they are reliable and trustworthy in their responsibilities.

  3. Family life: Deacons must be “the husband of one wife,” and must manage their children and household well.

  4. Service: Deacons must have a heart for service, and must be “deacons in service” or “ministering” to others.

Overall, the biblical requirements for deacons focus on their character, faithfulness, family life, and heart for service.



What are some key differences between a Deacon & an Elder?

According to Alexander Strauch’s book “The New Testament Deacon,” there are several key differences between deacons and elders:

  1. Responsibilities: Elders are primarily responsible for the spiritual oversight and teaching of the church, while deacons are primarily responsible for practical service and ministry.

  2. Qualifications: The qualifications for elders are more extensive and include a greater emphasis on teaching and leadership abilities, while the qualifications for deacons are focused more on character and service.

  3. Number: Churches typically have multiple deacons, while they may have a smaller number of elders.

  4. Selection: Elders are typically appointed or recognized by the congregation, while deacons may be appointed by the elders or selected through a more informal process.

  5. Authority: Elders have more authority in the church, including the authority to teach, preach, and make decisions on behalf of the church, while deacons have a more supportive role.



What are reasons for & against women being Deacons?

Reasons for women as deacons:

  1. Historical precedent: There is evidence from the early church that women served in diaconal roles alongside men.
  2. Scripture supports women serving in ministry: There are examples in the New Testament of women who served in important ministry roles, such as Phoebe who is described as a “deacon” in Romans 16:1.
  3. The role of a deacon is primarily one of service: The biblical qualifications for deacons do not include any specific gender requirements, and the role of a deacon is primarily focused on practical service and ministry, which women are well-suited to.

Reasons against women as deacons:

  1. The role of a deacon is one of leadership: While the primary responsibility of a deacon is practical service, there may be times when they are required to exercise leadership, which some believe should be reserved for men.
  2. The qualifications for deacons are described in masculine terms: In 1 Timothy 3:8-13, the qualifications for deacons are described using masculine language, which some believe indicates that the role is reserved for men.
  3. The potential for confusion: Allowing women to serve as deacons may create confusion or conflict within the church, particularly if there are differing opinions on the matter.

Overall, Strauch acknowledges that there are valid arguments on both sides of the issue, and that churches should prayerfully consider their own convictions and cultural context when making decisions about women serving as deacons.



Do we see any historical examples of female deacons?

The Bible is not entirely clear on the topic. There is much debate over this topic. However, here are some examples on prominent women that served:

  1. Phoebe, a Deaconess: In Romans 16:1, Paul writes, “I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a deaconess of the church at Cenchreae, so that you may welcome her in the Lord as is fitting for the saints, and help her in whatever she may require from you, for she has been a benefactor of many and of myself as well.” While the precise nature of Phoebe’s role as a “deaconess” is not entirely clear, many scholars believe that this was a formal diaconal role in the early church.

  2. Other Women in Ministry: There are several other examples in the New Testament of women who served in important ministry roles alongside men, including:

  • Priscilla, who along with her husband Aquila, taught Apollos more accurately about the way of God (Acts 18:26)
  • Junia, who is described as “prominent among the apostles” in Romans 16:7
  • Euodia and Syntyche, who are described as Paul’s fellow workers in Philippians 4:2-3
  1. Historical Evidence: There is also some evidence from early Christian writings and art that suggests that women served in diaconal roles in the early church. For example, the Didascalia Apostolorum, a third-century Christian text, includes instructions for the ordination of women as deaconesses.

Overall, while the precise nature and extent of women’s ministry roles in the early church is a matter of some debate among scholars, there is evidence to suggest that women did serve in important ministry roles, including diaconal roles



Women Deacons & Biblical Interpretations

Jonathan Strauch, in his book “The New Testament Deacon: The Church’s Minister of Mercy,” outlines several potential interpretations of the role of female deacons in the early Christian church. These include:

  1. The traditional interpretation, which holds that women in the early church were appointed to serve in a distinct and separate role from male deacons, with responsibilities that were primarily focused on the needs of women in the church.

  2. The egalitarian interpretation, which holds that women in the early church were appointed to the same diaconal role as men, with the same responsibilities and duties.

  3. The complementarian interpretation, which holds that while women were appointed to a distinct and separate diaconal role, their responsibilities were still important and valuable in serving the needs of the church.

  4. The cultural interpretation, which holds that the appointment of women as deacons was simply a reflection of the cultural norms and expectations of the time, and does not necessarily have any significant theological or practical implications for the contemporary church.

Strauch notes that each of these interpretations has its own strengths and weaknesses, and that there is no one “correct” view on the role of female deacons in the early church. He encourages readers to engage in careful study of the biblical and historical evidence, and to approach the question with humility, open-mindedness, and a commitment to serving the needs of the church in whatever ways are most effective and faithful.



What are some of the differences in vetting a Deacon vs. an Elder?

In many churches, the process for vetting deacons is less rigorous and demanding than the process for vetting elders. This is because the role of deacon is generally seen as more focused on serving practical needs and assisting with administrative tasks, while the role of elder is seen as more focused on spiritual leadership, teaching, and shepherding the congregation.

Typically, the process for vetting deacons involves a review of the candidate’s character, qualifications, and willingness to serve in the role. This may involve an interview with the candidate, a review of their references and background, and a period of observation and evaluation to ensure that they are suited to the demands of the role.

The process for vetting elders, on the other hand, is usually more extensive and involves a greater level of scrutiny and evaluation. This may include a review of the candidate’s theological knowledge, spiritual maturity, leadership ability, and pastoral experience. Elders are typically expected to demonstrate a deep commitment to the gospel, a strong understanding of biblical teaching, and a track record of faithful service to the church.

Evangelist



What did Paul expect from Evangelists?

The apostle Paul’s letters to Timothy and Titus contain several references to the role of evangelists in the early church. While the term “evangelist” is not used in every case, it is clear that Paul had a specific set of responsibilities in mind for those engaged in the work of spreading the Gospel message. Some of the key responsibilities of evangelists as outlined in these letters include:

  • Preaching and teaching: Evangelists are called to proclaim the message of the Gospel to those who have not yet heard it, and to teach and instruct new believers in the faith (2 Timothy 4:2; Titus 2:1).

  • Equipping the saints: Evangelists are also responsible for helping to equip other believers for the work of ministry, so that the whole body of Christ can be built up and strengthened (Ephesians 4:11-12).

  • Building up the church: Evangelists are called to work in partnership with other leaders in the church, including pastors, elders, and deacons, to help build up the body of Christ and promote unity and maturity among believers (Ephesians 4:16; 2 Timothy 4:5).

  • Enduring hardship: Evangelists may face opposition and persecution as they carry out their work, and are called to remain steadfast and endure hardship for the sake of the Gospel (2 Timothy 4:5).

Paul talks to Timothy about doing the work of an evangelist in his second letter to Timothy, chapter 4, verses 1-5:

“In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. They will turn their ears away from the truth and turn aside to myths. But you, keep your head in all situations, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, discharge all the duties of your ministry.”

In this passage, Paul charges Timothy to preach the word, to correct, rebuke, and encourage, and to do the work of an evangelist, all with great patience and careful instruction. The context suggests that Paul is urging Timothy to persevere in his ministry, even in the face of opposition or apathy from those around him, and to continue to proclaim the gospel message faithfully.



What are some of the requirements of Evangelists?

John R.W. Stott, in his book “The Biblical Role of the Evangelist,” identifies several biblical requirements for an evangelist, based on his study of the New Testament. Some of these requirements include:

  1. A deep personal commitment to Christ: An evangelist must have a personal faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, and a deep love for Him that motivates his or her evangelistic work.

  2. A sound knowledge of the Gospel: An evangelist must have a clear understanding of the Gospel message and be able to communicate it accurately and effectively to others.

  3. A burden for the lost: An evangelist must have a heart for the lost and a desire to see people come to faith in Christ.

  4. A willingness to serve: An evangelist must be willing to serve others and to use his or her gifts and abilities to advance the cause of the Gospel.

  5. A strong commitment to the local church: An evangelist must be committed to the local church and work in partnership with other believers to advance the Gospel in their community and beyond.

  6. An ability to communicate effectively: An evangelist must be able to communicate the Gospel message in a way that is understandable and relevant to those who are not yet believers.

  7. An openness to the Holy Spirit: An evangelist must be open to the leading of the Holy Spirit and willing to follow His guidance in his or her evangelistic work.

Overall, Stott emphasizes that the role of the evangelist is to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ in a clear and compelling way, and to work in partnership with other believers to make disciples of all nations.



What is the relationship between Elder & Evangelist?

In terms of the difference between the authority of an evangelist and an elder, Dr. Jacoby notes that elders are generally seen as having a more formal and institutionalized role within the church, with specific responsibilities for oversight, leadership, and pastoral care. Evangelists, on the other hand, are often seen as having a more specialized and focused role in communicating the Gospel message to those outside the church.

Dr. Jacoby argues that both evangelists and elders have important roles to play within the church, and that their respective authorities are complementary rather than contradictory. He notes that while evangelists may not have the same formal authority as elders, their ability to reach people with the message of the Gospel can be a powerful tool for building up the church and reaching out to those who have not yet heard the message.

Overall, Dr. Jacoby emphasizes the importance of recognizing the unique gifts and callings of individuals within the church, and of working together in unity and mutual support to fulfill the mission of the church to make disciples of all nations. He sees both evangelists and elders as important and necessary components of the church’s mission, each bringing their own strengths and insights to the task of building up the body of Christ.

Teachers



What are some Biblical references on the topic?

The Bible mentions the office of teacher in a few places, and highlights the importance of teaching in the life of the church. Here are a few examples:

  1. Ephesians 4:11-12: “So Christ himself gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the pastors and teachers, to equip his people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up.” In this passage, the apostle Paul lists various roles that Christ has given to the church, including that of teacher. The purpose of these roles is to equip God’s people for works of service and to build up the church.

  2. James 3:1: “Not many of you should become teachers, my fellow believers, because you know that we who teach will be judged more strictly.” In this passage, the writer warns that the role of teacher is a serious responsibility and one that carries a high standard of accountability. Those who teach must be careful to handle God’s word rightly and to live in a manner consistent with their message.

  3. 1 Timothy 3:2: “Now the overseer is to be above reproach, faithful to his wife, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach.” In this passage, Paul gives qualifications for the role of overseer (or elder) in the church, and one of the requirements is that the person be able to teach. This suggests that teaching is a key aspect of the elder’s role.



What does the role entail?

  1. The role of teacher is a vital one in the life of the church. According to Ephesians 4:11-12, Christ has given the church apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers, all for the purpose of building up the body of Christ. Teachers are called to help equip God’s people for works of service and to help them grow in their understanding of God’s word.

  2. The role of teacher should not be limited to just a few people. In Dr. Jacoby’s view, all Christians are called to be teachers in some sense, as they share their faith with others and help them grow in their understanding of God’s truth. However, there are also those who are called to be teachers in an official capacity, either as part of the church staff or as lay leaders who are recognized for their teaching gifts.

  3. The role of teacher should be grounded in sound doctrine. Dr. Jacoby emphasizes the importance of teaching that is faithful to the biblical text and that upholds the key doctrines of the Christian faith. Teachers should be well-trained in the study of the Bible and should be committed to helping others understand it in its original context.

  4. The role of teacher should be focused on transformation. In Dr. Jacoby’s view, the goal of teaching is not just to impart information, but to help people grow in their relationship with God and become more like Christ. Effective teaching should be aimed at helping people apply biblical principles to their everyday lives and become more loving, compassionate, and servant-hearted.



What does Dr. Douglas Jacoby say about Teachers?

Dr. Douglas Jacoby is a Christian author and teacher, and his views on the official role of teacher in the church are informed by his study of the Bible and his experience in ministry. Here are some key points from his teachings on this topic:

  1. The role of teacher is a vital one in the life of the church. According to Ephesians 4:11-12, Christ has given the church apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers, all for the purpose of building up the body of Christ. Teachers are called to help equip God’s people for works of service and to help them grow in their understanding of God’s word.

  2. The role of teacher should not be limited to just a few people. In Dr. Jacoby’s view, all Christians are called to be teachers in some sense, as they share their faith with others and help them grow in their understanding of God’s truth. However, there are also those who are called to be teachers in an official capacity, either as part of the church staff or as lay leaders who are recognized for their teaching gifts.

  3. The role of teacher should be grounded in sound doctrine. Dr. Jacoby emphasizes the importance of teaching that is faithful to the biblical text and that upholds the key doctrines of the Christian faith. Teachers should be well-trained in the study of the Bible and should be committed to helping others understand it in its original context.

  4. The role of teacher should be focused on transformation. In Dr. Jacoby’s view, the goal of teaching is not just to impart information, but to help people grow in their relationship with God and become more like Christ. Effective teaching should be aimed at helping people apply biblical principles to their everyday lives and become more loving, compassionate, and servant-hearted.

Overall, Dr. Jacoby sees the role of teacher as a vital one in the life of the church, and believes that those who are called to this ministry should be well-trained, grounded in sound doctrine, and focused on helping people grow in their relationship with God.

 

Dr. Douglas Jacoby’s view on whether women can be considered official “teachers” in the church is shaped by his understanding of the biblical text and his experience in ministry. Here are some key points from his teachings on this topic:

  1. The Bible presents examples of women who were involved in teaching and leadership roles. For example, in Acts 18:26, Priscilla and her husband Aquila are described as instructing Apollos in the way of the Lord. In Romans 16:1-2, Phoebe is described as a “servant” or “deaconess” of the church in Cenchreae, and is commended for her work. In 2 Timothy 1:5, Paul commends Timothy’s mother and grandmother for their faith, suggesting that they may have played a role in his spiritual development.

  2. The Bible also presents certain restrictions on women’s teaching roles. For example, in 1 Timothy 2:12, Paul instructs Timothy that he does not permit a woman to teach or to assume authority over a man; she must be quiet. Some scholars interpret this as a prohibition on women teaching in the church, while others argue that it is a specific instruction related to a particular situation in the Ephesian church.

  3. In Dr. Jacoby’s view, the key question is not whether women can be considered official “teachers” in the church, but whether they are gifted and called by God to teach. He believes that women can be effective teachers and leaders in the church, and that their gifts should be recognized and utilized. However, he also acknowledges that there are differing views on this topic among Christians, and that churches should seek to discern God’s will for their particular context.

Overall, Dr. Jacoby’s view is that women can be effective teachers in the church, and that their gifts should be recognized and utilized in accordance with biblical principles. However, he also acknowledges that there are differing views on this topic among Christians, and that churches should seek to discern God’s will for their particular context.



What does Dr. John Oakes think about women being teachers?

Dr. John Oakes has not explicitly stated his views on whether women can be considered official “teachers” in the church. However, he has written extensively on the topic of women’s roles in the church and has expressed his belief that the Bible presents a mixed message on this issue.

In his article “The Role of Women in the Church,” Dr. Oakes argues that the New Testament presents a tension between affirming women’s participation in ministry and placing limits on their authority in certain contexts. He notes that while women are depicted as active participants in the early church and are commended for their service and leadership, there are also passages that appear to limit their teaching and leadership roles.

In light of this tension, Dr. Oakes suggests that churches should seek to interpret and apply biblical teachings on women’s roles in a way that reflects both the cultural context of the Bible and the timeless principles it presents. He encourages churches to create opportunities for women to use their gifts in ministry, while also respecting biblical guidelines for church leadership.

While Dr. Oakes has not specifically addressed the question of women as “official teachers” in the church, it is likely that his views on this topic would be shaped by his broader understanding of women’s roles in ministry as presented in the Bible.

  

 

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